Published on Thu Nov 19 2015

A survey of nurses' practices and perceptions of family-centered care in Ireland.

Imelda Coyne, Maryanne Murphy, Thomas Costello, Colleen O'Neill, Claire Donnellan

Family-centered care is a philosophy of care that recognizes the family's central role in the child's life. We used a survey design to investigate the practices and perceptions of nurses toward FCC in Ireland. Findings indicated that nurses' practices were significantly different from their perceptions of FCC.

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Abstract

Family-centered care (FCC) is a philosophy of care that recognizes the family's central role in the child's life and in the delivery of care. We used a survey design to investigate the practices and perceptions of nurses toward FCC in Ireland. Data were obtained from 250 nurses in seven hospitals using the Family-Centered Care Questionnaire-Revised (FCCQ-R). Findings indicated that nurses' practices were significantly different from their perceptions of FCC. Nurses with dual registration (children and adult) had significantly lower mean scores on the total current (practice) scale than the other registration subgroups. Nurses with a baccalaureate or a higher academic qualification had higher mean scores than nurses who held a certificate-level qualification on the total necessary (perception) scale, which assessed the activities perceived to be necessary for FCC. Findings showed that nurses support FCC but perceive the design of the health care system and parent-professional collaboration as barriers to FCC practice.