Published on Fri Nov 20 2009

Need for emergency surgical airway reduced by a comprehensive difficult airway program.

Lauren C Berkow, Robert S Greenberg, Kristin H Kan, Elizabeth Colantuoni, Lynette J Mark, Paul W Flint, Marco Corridore, Nasir Bhatti, Eugenie S Heitmiller

Inability to intubate and ventilate patients with respiratory failure is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A patient is considered to have a difficult airway if an anesthesiologist or other health care provider is unable to Ventilate the patient's lungs.

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Abstract

Inability to intubate and ventilate patients with respiratory failure is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A patient is considered to have a difficult airway if an anesthesiologist or other health care provider experienced in airway management is unable to ventilate the patient's lungs using bag-mask ventilation and/or is unable to intubate the trachea using direct laryngoscopy.