Published on Sun Sep 26 2021

Behavioral Markers for Deficits in Speed of Processing in Cerebrovascular Disease

Chen, Y., Sunderland, K. M., Khoo, Y., McLaughlin, P. M., Kwan, D., Fraser, J., Ramirez, J., Binns, M. A., Arnott, S. R., Beaton, D., Brien, D. C., Casaubon, L. K., Coe, B. C., Cornish, B., Dowlatshahi, D., Hassan, A., Levine, B., Lou, W., Mandzia, J., McIlroy, W., Montero-Odasso, M., Ooteghem, K. V., Orange, J. B., Peltsch, A. J., Pieruccini-Faria, F., Raamana, P. R., Roberts, A. C., Sahlas, D., Saposnik, G., Strother, S. C., Swartz, R. H., Troyer, A. K., Munoz, D. M.

A cohort of 161 participants with cerebrovascular disease recruited to the Ontario Neurodegenerative Disease Research Initiative (ONDRI) were examined with three types of assessments. Principal component analysis (PCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were performed on select variables from these assessments.

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Abstract

Objective: To assess overlap and uniqueness of established behavioral markers of speed of processing for different aspects of visual information within a cerebrovascular disease cohort, and to examine the link between these speed of processing markers and functional behavior, specifically walking. Methods: A cohort of 161 participants with cerebrovascular disease recruited to the Ontario Neurodegenerative Disease Research Initiative (ONDRI) were examined with three types of assessments: neuropsychology, saccadic eye movement and gait. Principal component analysis (PCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were performed on select variables from these assessments to reveal commonalities and discrepancies among the measures. Results: PCA analysis revealed different variable patterns between neuropsychology and saccade assessments, with the first component characterized primarily by neuropsychology, and the second and third components more influenced by the saccade assessments. CCA analysis did not reveal association between different types of assessments with the exception of a modest, but significant, positive association between speed of processing measures from the neuropsychological assessments and gait speed. Discussion: Neuropsychological tests and the pro-saccade task can be used for assessment of speed of processing for two major features of visual information, visual perception vs. spatial location. Despite a general lack of association between different types of assessments, combining gait speed as an important contributor to the models reinforces the idea of the link between speed of processing and complex function such as walking, and provides support for the importance of attending to the potential consequences of changes in speed of processing after neurologic injury.