Published on Mon Jul 19 2021

Exploring the relationship between resting state intra-network connectivity and accelerometer-measured physical activity in pediatric concussion: A cohort study.

Sharma, B., Obeid, J., DeMatteo, C., Noseworthy, M. D., Timmons, B. W.

Fourteen children with concussion were included in this secondary data-analysis. Participants had neuroimaging at 15.3 days post-injury and subsequently a mean of 11.1 days of accelerometer data. Intra-network connectivity of the default mode network (DMN), sensorimotor network (SMN), salience network (SN) was computed.

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Abstract

Objectives: To explore the association between resting state functional connectivity and accelerometer-measured physical activity in pediatric concussion. Methods: Fourteen children with concussion (aged 14.54 {+/-} 2.39 years, 8 female) were included in this secondary data-analysis. Participants had neuroimaging at 15.3 {+/-} 6.7 days post-injury and subsequently a mean of 11.1 {+/-} 5.0 days of accelerometer data. Intra-network connectivity of the default mode network (DMN), sensorimotor network (SMN), salience network (SN), and fronto-parietal network (FPN) was computed. Results: Per general linear models, only intra-network connectivity of the DMN was associated with habitual physical activity levels. More specifically, increased intra-network connectivity of the DMN was significantly associated with higher levels of subsequent accelerometer-measured light physical activity (F(2, 11) = 7.053, p = 0.011, Ra2 = 0.562; {beta} = 0.469), moderate physical activity (F(2, 11) = 7.053, p = 0.011, Ra2 = 0.562; {beta} = 0.725), and vigorous physical activity (F(2, 11) = 10.855, p = 0.002, Ra2 = 0.664; {beta} = 0.79). Intra-network connectivity of the DMN did not significantly predict sedentary time. Likewise, the SMN, SA, and FPN were not significantly associated with either sedentary time or physical activity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that there is a positive association between the intra-network connectivity of the DMN and device-measured physical activity in children with concussion. Given that DMN impairment can be commonplace following concussion, this may be associated with lower levels of habitual physical activity, which can preclude children from experiencing the symptom-improving benefits of sub-maximal physical activity.