Published on Sun Aug 29 2021

The EPIPHA-KNEE trial: Explaining Pain to target unhelpful pain beliefs to Increase PHysical Activity in KNEE osteoarthritis - a protocol for a multicentre, randomised controlled trial with clinical- and cost-effectiveness analysis.

Tasha R Stanton, Felicity A Braithwaite, David Butler, G Lorimer Moseley, Catherine Hill, Rachel Milte, Julie Ratcliffe, Carol Maher, Christy Tomkins-Lane, Brian W Pulling, Erin MacIntyre, Adrian Esterman, Ty Stanford, Hopin Lee, Francois Fraysse, Ben Metcalf, Brendan Mouatt, Kim Bennell

Nine out of ten people with knee osteoarthritis are inactive. People with knee OA who are inactive often believe that physical activity is dangerous. Such unhelpful beliefs can negatively influence physical activity levels.

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Abstract

Despite well-established benefits of physical activity for knee osteoarthritis (OA), nine of ten people with knee OA are inactive. People with knee OA who are inactive often believe that physical activity is dangerous, fearing that it will further damage their joint(s). Such unhelpful beliefs can negatively influence physical activity levels. We aim to evaluate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of integrating physiotherapist-delivered pain science education (PSE), an evidence-based conceptual change intervention targeting unhelpful pain beliefs by increasing pain knowledge, with an individualised walking, strengthening, and general education program.